When talk of family comes up, most Texas pet owners are proud to say that their pets are a part of the family.  While it can be difficult to think about a time where you may suffer an incapacitating injury, you do want to consider your pets’ lives if something were to happen to you. Most people ensure that their property is safe and that their families have proper care following an illness or death. What people often forget, however, is to include the pets in the estate plan.

The National Law Review states that you can appoint care for your pets in the case of your death or incapacitation. In order to add your pets to the estate plan, you will want to appoint a caretaker. It is crucial that you speak to the caretaker in advance so that you do not spring the pet on him or her in the case of an unfortunate incident. To include your pet in the plan, you will want to include a pet information sheet. This sheet includes feeding instructions, personality notes and the basics about your animal.

Another form that you can fill out for your pet is a Pet Care Authorization form. This is similar to a form that you sign when a minor stays with a relative. This form provides permission to an agent to take a pet for medical care. You can include pets in your Last Will and Testament or your Revocable Living Trust. Many pet owners also allocate funds to the caretaker in the will or trust.